Reviews


Shaw Goes Wilde presented by Pegasus Opera Company

Pegasus Opera aims to provide opportunities for artistes of diverse backgrounds and to promote opera in under-served and culturally diverse communities. To this end, it provides educational programmes for thousands of young people in London and the regions. It also stages productions, this time a double bill of two short operas by the American (b 1932) composer Philip Hagemann, who also conducted. Of the two works performed at the new Susie Sainsbury Theatre at the …

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Liza Pulman Sings Streisand at the Lyric Theatre, London

Firstly, this was not a tribute act or impersonator; there were no wigs or reenactments. Secondly, this was not a journey through the life of Barbara Streisand; although it was littered with historical facts. These points were clearly made by the singer at the opening of the show, which was helpful, as truthfully I wasn’t sure what to expect. She also made it very clear multiple times that her name is pronounced Liza, as in …

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The Show in Which Hopefully Nothing Happens | Review

The Show in Which Hopefully Nothing Happens is a child-centric theatrical masterpiece that feels like Pinter meeting pantomime for the Pixar audience. My two six-year-old co-critics were rapt from the moment they entered the Unicorn’s black box Clore Theatre and beamed and belly-laughed for the play’s duration. Veterans of quality children’s theatre, like The Gruffalo’s Child or We’re Going on A Bear Hunt, will be taken to a new level of audience engagement – even …

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Yard Players Presents: King Lear at The Brockley Jack Theatre

A classic text has become contemporary, and in true Shakespearean fashion, is a tragedy with many deaths. Luckily these deaths only pertain to the characters, as the portrayal of them and the theatre devising was very enjoyable. In an intimate black box theatre in Brockley, King Lear, played by Alan Booty Edgar, takes the stage and we are introduced to his woes. Thanks to the director and designer James Elsey’s devising, utilizing modern music and …

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The Phil Willmott Company’s Shakespeare’s Othello | Review

To mark the centenary of the Amritsar massacre (1919) director Phil Willmott has set Othello (1601) somewhere in India. For a British audience familiar with A Passage to India (1924) or The Raj Quartet (1975) or indeed the film Gandhi (1982) this works. We can more readily get to grips with racial, social and gender dynamics. Othello (Matthew Wade) is here a conflicted collaborator in British rule. A general in the Indian army who has …

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