Author: Emily Diver


The Hunchback of Notre Dame – Saint Paul’s Church, Covent Garden

What better place is there to put on a play set in the surroundings of a cathedral than in the surroundings of a church? A church nicknamed ‘The Actors’ Church’ in fact. The setting was used well in this promenade production as we moved around the churchyard, although it was perhaps most fitting at the end when we were ushered inside the church for the final scene. There was even brief use of the organ. …

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Review of Absolute Hell by Rodney Ackland | National Theatre

When we think of World War II we, of course, think of life in that period as absolute hell. Everything about it from the concentration camps to the death and destruction of the blitz is devastating. But we rarely think about what happened next, because, in reality, an event like that doesn’t happen in isolation, people can’t just go back to normal after what they’ve seen, and that is what Absolute Hell is about- a …

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The View From Nowhere at Park Theatre – Review

Every day the news is full of things we should and shouldn’t do to stave off cancer, every decision we make seems to have some huge bearing on whether or not we end up suffering from this dreadful disease. So this play asks a simple question, if we are encouraged to control what we do in order to prevent carcinogens entering our system, then why is the farming industry so blasé about the chemicals it …

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Off The King’s Road at Jermyn Street Theatre – Review

When Matt Bourne, a man lost in grief for his ex-wife decides to stay at a hotel ‘Off the King’s Road’ he goes on a journey he’ll never forget. Steeped in loneliness, he meets an equally lonely prostitute, Sheena, and another equally lonely widow, Ellen Mellman, and her cat, Christina. This play celebrates London but not in the usual way. Whilst many plays about London focus on the culture, this one focuses on what really …

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Review of Antigone at The Hope Theatre London

One could almost say that Sophocles’ work in 400-500BC is tantamount to the birth of feminism. Giving women a voice, and more importantly, agency in their lives would have been unusual, if not unheard of, in Sophocles time, illustrated by the way in which they were brought up to be, in the words of Pericles, “inconspicuous.” The play draws on these themes such that when a crime has been committed the consideration that it could have been a woman …

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